Blueberry Pancake Cookies

bluebdehydrated

I did not wish to attempt parboiling the blueberries, so I cut every one in half and slowly dehydrated them on low temp in my gas oven.

12:41 a.m., and I submit to failure once again, and turn to sleep. Blueberry Pancake Cookies, attempt #3. Closer, but not there yet.

A year ago I came up with the brilliant idea of using a chocolate chip cookie recipe, but replacing the chocolate chips with dehydrated blueberries, and replacing the sugar with 100% maple sugar. The results were underwhelming. The blueberries and the maple sugar gave little flavor, and the texture was too chewy to be a decent imitation of pancakes. They were yummy cookies, but not the desired results.

The second attempt was this early spring, when I replaced the chocolate chip recipe with a snickerdoodle recipe. I persisted in using dehydrated blueberries, believing the dough around them would not cook if they were moist (later to be found untrue). I again replaced the sugar with maple sugar, but also rolled the cookies in maple sugar (usually snickerdoodles are rolled in cinnamon and sugar). The texture was better, but again, the blueberried and maple were too subdued. Many compliments on the cookies, but again, not what I was aiming for.

This time, I did it more methodically. Started with the basic snickerdoodle recipe, using regular sugar, and ripe blueberries. It took some figuring out how to add the blueberries. First, I mixed them in. Then I tried rolling the dough out and wrapping it around the berries. Then I tried with the berries on the bottom. Finally I struck upon the lightly pushing in the berries on top, as pictured below. It worked like a charm.

bluebcookiesinpan

Non-mapley blueberry pancake cookies, pre-baked.

If you are wondering about my pan, it is because I am cooking these in my loft room late at night, using a convection toaster oven, and this bread pan was the closest thing I could find to a cookie sheet that would fit in it. Sadly, the toaster oven was not warm enough (first time using it), and the cookies came out a bit flat.

cookingupstais

My cooking arrangement, just before midnight.

I do not have a recipe yet. I cut back the sugar this time, but I think I should cut it back even further. And I still have yet to figure out a good way to distribute maple flavor. The trouble with maple, is that on its own it has a marvelous flavor (I often take swigs from the bottle), but after a minute in contact with anything bready, and the flavor disappears almost entirely. On this attempt, I did try pouring syrup on one, letting it soak it up, but it fell apart, and the flavor, yes, disappeared. And I tried spreading maple butter (this is simply 100% maple content whipped, no dairy) on one, but it’s too soft and sticky. I am leaning towards playing with frostings and glaze recipes. Or boiling syrup until it’s maple sugar candy. Or maybe what I need to do is get some actual maple extract, stuff which has any real maple in it whatsoever (tough to find).

bluebcookieseat

Attempt #3. Yummy, but no cigar.

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7 comments to Blueberry Pancake Cookies

  • lamb

    my god! what are you doing baking cookies at 0100? coffee is probhibited! ;b

  • I think a maple frosting would work well.

  • Lamb: Worse that baking, was the eating all of the trial cookies at 1:00. :)
    Daniel: the main issue is that i don’t want it to be a CREAMY frosting, the creaminess take too much away from the maple experience. But I’ve been reading about maple candy this morning, and have a few ideas to try. I just need an oven thermometer and a candy thermometer. :)

  • I would suggest a maple glaze . . . that way it would mimic the syrup effect you’re going for. maple syrup and a bit of powdered sugar to your desired consistency should do the trick. regardless of your thoughts, that cookie looks yummy.

  • Maple syrup and powdered sugar. Hmmm…. I may try that.

    Today I got a candy thermometer, so I’m going to try to make briefly-pourable maple sugar candy out of only maple syrup, to pour on top where it should solidify. We’ll see!

  • Tim

    Chris,
    for cooking, make sure it’s a) pure maple syrup (a must!) and b) preferably Grade B. If that’s not available, try Grade A (dark Amber) which might work but won’t give a strong maple taste.
    The lighter amber Grade A, used mainly for eating, is way too mild for cooking.

  • Grade b…. hm. Good thinking. As a New englander, i appreciate this logic.

    Yes, definitely pure maple syrup. And I plan to get maple extract with actual maple in it, but this week did not get to it. :)